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Active physiotherapy strategies for modulation of the sensory-motor cortex in people with chronic musculoskeletal pain

People with chronic musculoskeletal pain have abnormalities in the primary motor and sensitive cortex. Within these alterations, one of the most investigated in the field of chronic musculoskeletal pain is the phenomenon of “smudging” or alteration of the cortical representation of the muscles in areas where pain is suffered. From physiotherapy, we can act on the primary cortex through cost-effective intervention techniques, whose use and results have been traditionally justified by a tissue-local theory or explanation. Techniques such as local vibration, post-isometry activation, foam roller massage or motor control techniques can be used to modulate cortical electrical activation excesses, as well as to improve the representation of body areas in said cortex. These interventions, together with proper management of the cognitions and emotions associated with the pain that the person presents, can help improve their painful experience.

Alejandro Luque

  • Diploma in Physiotherapy, University of Malaga.
  • Bachelor of Social and Cultural Anthropology.
  • Doctor of Health Sciences, University of Malaga.
  • Expert in Manual Therapy and Sports Physiotherapy Specialist, University of Malaga.
  • Professor of Physiotherapy, University of Málaga.
  • Director of the Expert in motor control and pain at the University of Malaga.
  • Postdoctoral research stays on low back pain at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, and University of Sydney, Australia.
  • He has published several scientific articles related to chronic shoulder pain in journals such as Musculoskeletal Science & Practice, BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, BMJ Open … Also, in chronic musculoskeletal pain and beliefs associated with pain, in journals such as Journal of Pain, Clinical Journal of Pain , Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. With special relevance the articles published on kinesiophobia and chronic pain in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
  • His field of clinical and scientific interest lies in identifying prognostic factors of chronic musculoskeletal pain from a global perspective (physical, psychological and social), as well as studying those active intervention strategies that are applied to this condition from physiotherapy, such as exercise and / or education of the patient against pain.

Alejandro Luque

  • Diploma in Physiotherapy, University of Malaga.
  • Bachelor of Social and Cultural Anthropology.
  • Doctor of Health Sciences, University of Malaga.
  • Expert in Manual Therapy and Sports Physiotherapy Specialist, University of Malaga.
  • Professor of Physiotherapy, University of Málaga.
  • Director of the Expert in motor control and pain at the University of Malaga.
  • Postdoctoral research stays on low back pain at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, and University of Sydney, Australia.
  • He has published several scientific articles related to chronic shoulder pain in journals such as Musculoskeletal Science & Practice, BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, BMJ Open … Also, in chronic musculoskeletal pain and beliefs associated with pain, in journals such as Journal of Pain, Clinical Journal of Pain , Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. With special relevance the articles published on kinesiophobia and chronic pain in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
  • His field of clinical and scientific interest lies in identifying prognostic factors of chronic musculoskeletal pain from a global perspective (physical, psychological and social), as well as studying those active intervention strategies that are applied to this condition from physiotherapy, such as exercise and / or education of the patient against pain.

Active physiotherapy strategies for modulation of the sensory-motor cortex in people with chronic musculoskeletal pain

People with chronic musculoskeletal pain have abnormalities in the primary motor and sensitive cortex. Within these alterations, one of the most investigated in the field of chronic musculoskeletal pain is the phenomenon of “smudging” or alteration of the cortical representation of the muscles in areas where pain is suffered. From physiotherapy, we can act on the primary cortex through cost-effective intervention techniques, whose use and results have been traditionally justified by a tissue-local theory or explanation. Techniques such as local vibration, post-isometry activation, foam roller massage or motor control techniques can be used to modulate cortical electrical activation excesses, as well as to improve the representation of body areas in said cortex. These interventions, together with proper management of the cognitions and emotions associated with the pain that the person presents, can help improve their painful experience.