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Think it is not the nerve? Think twice!

Diagnosing a neural contribution remains a great challenge in clinical practice. There are clinical clues, but importantly also a number of pitfalls during assessment that may lead to inaccurate clinical conclusions.

In this talk, I will highlight potential clues and pitfalls in the assessment of patients with suspected neural contributions. This will include the value and limitations of dermatomes and innervation territories, the need for caution if neurodynamic tests are negative and why light touch, muscle and reflex testing are not sufficient to determine neurological integrity. I will also discuss limitations of current imaging methodologies and outline promising advances in neuroimaging. As such, this talk will give an update on the latest scientific evidence that can be implemented into clinical practice.

Annina Schmid

  • A/Prof Annina Schmid is a Consultant Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist and a Neuroscientist affiliated with the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences at Oxford University in the UK.
  • She qualified as a Physiotherapist in Switzerland in 2001 and obtained a Master in Manipulative Physiotherapy from Curtin University of Technology in Perth, Australia before completing a PhD in Neuroscience at The University of Queensland in Brisbane in 2011.
  • Annina’s research includes an exciting and unique combination of preclinical and clinical science which is aimed to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of neuropathic pain and entrapment neuropathies to ultimately improve management of these patients.
  • Annina has presented her work at leading international and national conferences and has published her work widely including publications in leading clinical (e.g., Brain, Nature Communication, Eur J Pain) and basic science journals (e.g., eLife, Nature Genetics).
  • Dr Schmid’s research contribution is recognised by the award of several grants, awards and competitive fellowships including the prestigious early career grant from the International Association for the Study of Pain.
  • In addition to her research activities, Dr Schmid teaches postgraduate courses related to pain and neuroscience internationally.
  • She also maintains a weekly caseload as a specialist musculoskeletal Physiotherapist. Further information can be found at www.neuro-research.ch.

Annina Schmid

  • A/Prof Annina Schmid is a Consultant Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist and a Neuroscientist affiliated with the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences at Oxford University in the UK.
  • She qualified as a Physiotherapist in Switzerland in 2001 and obtained a Master in Manipulative Physiotherapy from Curtin University of Technology in Perth, Australia before completing a PhD in Neuroscience at The University of Queensland in Brisbane in 2011.
  • Annina’s research includes an exciting and unique combination of preclinical and clinical science which is aimed to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of neuropathic pain and entrapment neuropathies to ultimately improve management of these patients.
  • Annina has presented her work at leading international and national conferences and has published her work widely including publications in leading clinical (e.g., Brain, Nature Communication, Eur J Pain) and basic science journals (e.g., eLife, Nature Genetics).
  • Dr Schmid’s research contribution is recognised by the award of several grants, awards and competitive fellowships including the prestigious early career grant from the International Association for the Study of Pain.
  • In addition to her research activities, Dr Schmid teaches postgraduate courses related to pain and neuroscience internationally.
  • She also maintains a weekly caseload as a specialist musculoskeletal Physiotherapist. Further information can be found at www.neuro-research.ch.

Think it is not the nerve? Think twice!

Diagnosing a neural contribution remains a great challenge in clinical practice. There are clinical clues, but importantly also a number of pitfalls during assessment that may lead to inaccurate clinical conclusions.

In this talk, I will highlight potential clues and pitfalls in the assessment of patients with suspected neural contributions. This will include the value and limitations of dermatomes and innervation territories, the need for caution if neurodynamic tests are negative and why light touch, muscle and reflex testing are not sufficient to determine neurological integrity. I will also discuss limitations of current imaging methodologies and outline promising advances in neuroimaging. As such, this talk will give an update on the latest scientific evidence that can be implemented into clinical practice.