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Assessment of pain mechanisms

Treatments for persistent pain have a clinically significant effectiveness in a minority of patients. It has been suggested that one of the causes may be a poor classification of pain, based solely on signs and symptoms or on a diagnostic label based on a structural pathology. Diagnostic labels, although they may be useful, provide little information on the underlying mechanisms of pain. Because both physical treatments such as exercise or manual therapy, such as pharmacological ones, have an effect on the mechanisms, an assessment of them becomes necessary. This assessment has been used in research through the so-called Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST). The QST consists in the systematized application of a series of stimuli on the person, and the subsequent measurement of the sensory response. The QST has shown that it can offer reliable, repeatable and diagnostic useful assessment protocols with some of its modalities, providing information on the gain or loss of function of the sensory system and more specifically, of the nociceptive system and pain. Although the use of clinical QST is controversial due to the variable reliability in this area and a high cost apparatus, knowing simple and low cost ways to assess the mechanisms of pain, can provide the clinician with useful resources. In addition, it can open a window to clinical practice in which the mechanisms of pain are assessed and integrated into the assessment and treatment of patients with pain. In this workshop, you will learn the basis for assessing these mechanisms.

Enrique Lluch

  • PhD in Aging Processes: Socio-Health Strategies from the University of Valencia
  • PhD in Manual Physiotherapy from the University of Alcalá de Henares
  • Graduated in Physiotherapy from the University of Valencia
  • Thesis directed in the last 10 years:
  • Application of an education program in pain neurophysiology in patients with chronic lower back pain. Doctoranda: Bodes Pardo Gem. Year 2017. University of Alcalá de Henares.
  • Total publications in first quartile (Q1): 17
  • Master’s Degree in Overtime ostepathy from the E.U Gimbernat de Barcelona (1998-2003)
  • Official Master’s Degree in Physiotherapy in Aging Processes: Socio-Health Strategies by the Faculty of Physiotherapy of Valencia (2010-2012)
  • Associate professor of 6 hours in the Usa of Valencia during the periods 2001-2005 and 2009-2011.
  • Professor in the Master’s Degree in Structural Ostepathy and Advanced Manipulative Techniques organized by the University of Valencia (ADEIT University Enterprise Foundation) (2001-present).
  • Professor in the Master’s Degree in Ostepathy organized by the U.S. Gimbernat de Barcelona (2006-present).
  • Professor of the Travell and Simons seminars on myofascial pain (2003-present)
  • Guest speaker at 20 national and international congresses.
  • Speaker of 8 oral communications and 23 poster presentations at national/international/global congresses.
  • Member of the research group Pain in motion (paininmotion.be) belonging to the Vrijte Universiteit Brussels (VUB) and led by Jo Nijs, since 2012.
  • Member of the Research Group Physiotherapy, Technology and Recovery (FTR) belonging to the Department of Physiotherapy of the Faculty of Physiotherapy of Valencia led by Yasser Alakhdar, since 2014.

Enrique Lluch

  • PhD in Aging Processes: Socio-Health Strategies from the University of Valencia
  • PhD in Manual Physiotherapy from the University of Alcalá de Henares
  • Graduated in Physiotherapy from the University of Valencia
  • Thesis directed in the last 10 years:
  • Application of an education program in pain neurophysiology in patients with chronic lower back pain. Doctoranda: Bodes Pardo Gem. Year 2017. University of Alcalá de Henares.
  • Total publications in first quartile (Q1): 17
  • Master’s Degree in Overtime ostepathy from the E.U Gimbernat de Barcelona (1998-2003)
  • Official Master’s Degree in Physiotherapy in Aging Processes: Socio-Health Strategies by the Faculty of Physiotherapy of Valencia (2010-2012)
  • Associate professor of 6 hours in the Usa of Valencia during the periods 2001-2005 and 2009-2011.
  • Professor in the Master’s Degree in Structural Ostepathy and Advanced Manipulative Techniques organized by the University of Valencia (ADEIT University Enterprise Foundation) (2001-present).
  • Professor in the Master’s Degree in Ostepathy organized by the U.S. Gimbernat de Barcelona (2006-present).
  • Professor of the Travell and Simons seminars on myofascial pain (2003-present)
  • Guest speaker at 20 national and international congresses.
  • Speaker of 8 oral communications and 23 poster presentations at national/international/global congresses.
  • Member of the research group Pain in motion (paininmotion.be) belonging to the Vrijte Universiteit Brussels (VUB) and led by Jo Nijs, since 2012.
  • Member of the Research Group Physiotherapy, Technology and Recovery (FTR) belonging to the Department of Physiotherapy of the Faculty of Physiotherapy of Valencia led by Yasser Alakhdar, since 2014.

Assessment of pain mechanisms

Treatments for persistent pain have a clinically significant effectiveness in a minority of patients. It has been suggested that one of the causes may be a poor classification of pain, based solely on signs and symptoms or on a diagnostic label based on a structural pathology. Diagnostic labels, although they may be useful, provide little information on the underlying mechanisms of pain. Because both physical treatments such as exercise or manual therapy, such as pharmacological ones, have an effect on the mechanisms, an assessment of them becomes necessary. This assessment has been used in research through the so-called Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST). The QST consists in the systematized application of a series of stimuli on the person, and the subsequent measurement of the sensory response. The QST has shown that it can offer reliable, repeatable and diagnostic useful assessment protocols with some of its modalities, providing information on the gain or loss of function of the sensory system and more specifically, of the nociceptive system and pain. Although the use of clinical QST is controversial due to the variable reliability in this area and a high cost apparatus, knowing simple and low cost ways to assess the mechanisms of pain, can provide the clinician with useful resources. In addition, it can open a window to clinical practice in which the mechanisms of pain are assessed and integrated into the assessment and treatment of patients with pain. In this workshop, you will learn the basis for assessing these mechanisms.