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Exercise-induced hypoalgesia – clinical implications

Exercise can reduce the pain sensitivity also known as exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) and serves as a promising evidence-based treatment for many chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. However, individuals with chronic pain often experience several barriers to exercising such as increases in pain and beliefs that hurt equals harm. Possible mechanisms underlying these barriers will be discussed from a mechanistic point of view and possible implications for rehabilitation will be addressed.

Henrik Bjarke Vægter

  • Henrik Bjarke Vaegter is in a position as Associate Professor in Physiotherapy at the Department of Clinical Research at the University of Southern Denmark and is head of the Pain Research Group at the Multidisciplinary Pain Center at the University Hospital Odense.
  • Henrik received his bachelor in Physiotherapy in 2004 and holds a PhD in Pain Neuroscience from Aalborg University, Denmark and a MSc degree in Pain Management from University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
  • His research focuses on clinical and experimental manifestations of chronic pain with a special focus on the effect of exercise on pain sensitivity and pain modulatory mechanisms in humans.
  • He has published widely on exercise hypoalgesia and is recognized internationally for his expertise within this area.

Henrik Bjarke Vægter

  • Henrik Bjarke Vaegter is in a position as Associate Professor in Physiotherapy at the Department of Clinical Research at the University of Southern Denmark and is head of the Pain Research Group at the Multidisciplinary Pain Center at the University Hospital Odense.
  • Henrik received his bachelor in Physiotherapy in 2004 and holds a PhD in Pain Neuroscience from Aalborg University, Denmark and a MSc degree in Pain Management from University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
  • His research focuses on clinical and experimental manifestations of chronic pain with a special focus on the effect of exercise on pain sensitivity and pain modulatory mechanisms in humans.
  • He has published widely on exercise hypoalgesia and is recognized internationally for his expertise within this area.

Exercise-induced hypoalgesia – clinical implications

Exercise can reduce the pain sensitivity also known as exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) and serves as a promising evidence-based treatment for many chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. However, individuals with chronic pain often experience several barriers to exercising such as increases in pain and beliefs that hurt equals harm. Possible mechanisms underlying these barriers will be discussed from a mechanistic point of view and possible implications for rehabilitation will be addressed.