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Tips, tricks and pitfalls in teaching consumers about pain science

Pain science education is now a critical component of best practice care for anyone in pain. It is difficult because consumer expectations rarely align with contemporary science and if we are to ‘sell’ high value care, we first have to change how people understand the problem. One challenge that has emerged is a new barrier to learning put in place by poor educational approaches. I think this reflects incomplete understanding of the content, the people involved (ie you and the patient) and the context. In this workshop I will present several principles of presenting new information and simple ways you can integrate them into your everyday encounters with consumers so as to maximise the likelihood of ‘making it stick’.

Lorimer Moseley

  • Qualifications: BAppSc(Phty)(Hons) (1992) | PhD (2002) | FACP (2011) | DSc (2017) | FAAHMS | HonFFPM(ANZCA) | HonMAPA
  • Previous: NHMRC Post-doctoral fellowship at Queensland University & Sydney University (2002-5)   |  Nuffield Medical Research Fellow, the University of Oxford, UK  (2005-8) | University Fellow, University of Oxford (2009).
  • Current: NHMRC PRF | Professor of Clinical Neurosciences & Foundation Chair in Physiotherapy, University of South Australia | Senior PRF, Neuroscience Research Australia | Chair, Pain Adelaide Stakeholders’ Consortium.
  • Moseley has authored 340 articles. He has given 70 Plenary lectures at major international meetings in 26 countries. Ande he has supervised 25 PhD and 16 Honours students to completion.
  • In the last 5 years he has authored 168 papers and he has given 34 Plenary lectures at major international meetings in 26 countries, including the Biennial World, American, Pan-African and Canadian Pain Congresses.
  • He has won awards or prizes from national pain societies or physiotherapy associations in 12 countries, including the American Physical Therapy Association’s Friend of the Association Award.
  • He is Chief Editor of Body in Mind.
  • He has served on the Scientific Programme Committee and Refresher Course committee of the World Pain Congress. He is on the IASP Steering Committee to establish core outcomes for CRPS research.
  • He mentors 6 post-doctoral, 3 mid-career fellows, a senior research scientist, 8 PhD students. In the last five years, researchers under his mentorship/supervision have won the most prestigious student or trainee awards available internationally from the International Association for the Study of Pain. He won the inaugural Supervisor of the Year Award.
  • In 2018 he reviewed 42 papers.

Lorimer Moseley

  • Qualifications: BAppSc(Phty)(Hons) (1992) | PhD (2002) | FACP (2011) | DSc (2017) | FAAHMS | HonFFPM(ANZCA) | HonMAPA
  • Previous: NHMRC Post-doctoral fellowship at Queensland University & Sydney University (2002-5)   |  Nuffield Medical Research Fellow, the University of Oxford, UK  (2005-8) | University Fellow, University of Oxford (2009).
  • Current: NHMRC PRF | Professor of Clinical Neurosciences & Foundation Chair in Physiotherapy, University of South Australia | Senior PRF, Neuroscience Research Australia | Chair, Pain Adelaide Stakeholders’ Consortium.
  • Moseley has authored 340 articles. He has given 70 Plenary lectures at major international meetings in 26 countries. Ande he has supervised 25 PhD and 16 Honours students to completion.
  • In the last 5 years he has authored 168 papers and he has given 34 Plenary lectures at major international meetings in 26 countries, including the Biennial World, American, Pan-African and Canadian Pain Congresses.
  • He has won awards or prizes from national pain societies or physiotherapy associations in 12 countries, including the American Physical Therapy Association’s Friend of the Association Award.
  • He is Chief Editor of Body in Mind.
  • He has served on the Scientific Programme Committee and Refresher Course committee of the World Pain Congress. He is on the IASP Steering Committee to establish core outcomes for CRPS research.
  • He mentors 6 post-doctoral, 3 mid-career fellows, a senior research scientist, 8 PhD students. In the last five years, researchers under his mentorship/supervision have won the most prestigious student or trainee awards available internationally from the International Association for the Study of Pain. He won the inaugural Supervisor of the Year Award.
  • In 2018 he reviewed 42 papers.

Tips, tricks and pitfalls in teaching consumers about pain science

Pain science education is now a critical component of best practice care for anyone in pain. It is difficult because consumer expectations rarely align with contemporary science and if we are to ‘sell’ high value care, we first have to change how people understand the problem. One challenge that has emerged is a new barrier to learning put in place by poor educational approaches. I think this reflects incomplete understanding of the content, the people involved (ie you and the patient) and the context. In this workshop I will present several principles of presenting new information and simple ways you can integrate them into your everyday encounters with consumers so as to maximise the likelihood of ‘making it stick’.