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Hypnosis and hypnotic language to promote the adaptive coping of pain: Research findings and clinical implications

How well patients with chronic pain function depends much more one what patients do than on what is done to them. In order to function well with chronic pain, individuals need to maintain an active lifestyle – including engaging in the exercises that have been recommended for their particular pain problem. Often, depending on the chronic pain condition they are dealing with, they also need to manage their diet and weight, be maintain themselves as a non-smoker, and practice specific adaptive the coping skills.  In short, pain management is hard work. Many patients find the behavior changes necessary for effective pain management challenging. One strategy that health care can use to make such changes easier is hypnosis.  Hypnotic techniques gave been shown to result in improvements in both pain intensity and pain interference. This talk will present the evidence regarding the efficacy of hypnotic strategies and discuss specific hypnotic strategies that health care providers, including physical therapists, can use to help their patients more effectively manage pain.

Mark P. Jensen

  • Mark P. Jensen, Ph.D., is a Professor and Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle, USA.
  • He has been studying chronic pain and helping individuals better manage chronic pain for over 30 years.
  • He has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and numerous other funding agencies to study the efficacy and mechanisms of various treatments for chronic pain, including hypnosis.
  • He has published extensively (seven books and over 450 articles and book chapters) on the topics of pain assessment and treatment.
  • He and his team have completed research that has shown hypnosis to be effective for a variety of pain conditions, including pain assocaited with cancer,  low back pain, and pain associated with physical disabilities such as spinal cord injury and multiple sclerisos.
  • He has also been evaluating the mechanisms of hypnotic analgesia – in particular the effects of hypnosis on brain states and brain activity and how these brain activity changes may facilitate response to hypnotic suggestions.  His book on the use of hypnosis for chronic pain management (Hypnosis for Chronic Pain:  Therapist Guide, published by Oxford University Press) provides a popular intruduciton to hypnosis and hypnotic pain treatment, and won the Society of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis Arthur Shapiro Award for Best Book on Hypnosis.
  • He has also recently edited a book on hypnotic inductions (The Art and Practice of Hypnotic Inductions, published by Denny Creek Press), in which 11 master clinicians describe and model their favorite hypnotic induction.

Mark P. Jensen

  • Mark P. Jensen, Ph.D., is a Professor and Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle, USA.
  • He has been studying chronic pain and helping individuals better manage chronic pain for over 30 years.
  • He has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and numerous other funding agencies to study the efficacy and mechanisms of various treatments for chronic pain, including hypnosis.
  • He has published extensively (seven books and over 450 articles and book chapters) on the topics of pain assessment and treatment.
  • He and his team have completed research that has shown hypnosis to be effective for a variety of pain conditions, including pain assocaited with cancer,  low back pain, and pain associated with physical disabilities such as spinal cord injury and multiple sclerisos.
  • He has also been evaluating the mechanisms of hypnotic analgesia – in particular the effects of hypnosis on brain states and brain activity and how these brain activity changes may facilitate response to hypnotic suggestions.  His book on the use of hypnosis for chronic pain management (Hypnosis for Chronic Pain:  Therapist Guide, published by Oxford University Press) provides a popular intruduciton to hypnosis and hypnotic pain treatment, and won the Society of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis Arthur Shapiro Award for Best Book on Hypnosis.
  • He has also recently edited a book on hypnotic inductions (The Art and Practice of Hypnotic Inductions, published by Denny Creek Press), in which 11 master clinicians describe and model their favorite hypnotic induction.

Hypnosis and hypnotic language to promote the adaptive coping of pain: Research findings and clinical implications

How well patients with chronic pain function depends much more one what patients do than on what is done to them. In order to function well with chronic pain, individuals need to maintain an active lifestyle – including engaging in the exercises that have been recommended for their particular pain problem. Often, depending on the chronic pain condition they are dealing with, they also need to manage their diet and weight, be maintain themselves as a non-smoker, and practice specific adaptive the coping skills.  In short, pain management is hard work. Many patients find the behavior changes necessary for effective pain management challenging. One strategy that health care can use to make such changes easier is hypnosis.  Hypnotic techniques gave been shown to result in improvements in both pain intensity and pain interference. This talk will present the evidence regarding the efficacy of hypnotic strategies and discuss specific hypnotic strategies that health care providers, including physical therapists, can use to help their patients more effectively manage pain.