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Reflections on Neuropathies and Neurodynamics

The effective management of neuropathies, such as radiculopathy and cubital tunnel syndrome, remains challenging. Recent discoveries revealed local and remote neuro-immune responses following nerve entrapment. These remote responses include the dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord and brain. Insight in these widespread changes has helped us understand the complex clinical presentation of patients with neuropathies, the suboptimal diagnostic accuracy of clinical tests and technical investigations, and often poor treatment outcomes. However, it also forms the foundation and justification for various exercise interventions, such as neurodynamic and aerobic exercises. In this presentation, we will reveal pathobiological mechanisms, how interventions can reverse these, and what he clinical evidence (efficacy) is for various types of intervention for various conditions, such as nerve-related neck and back pain.

Michel Coppieters

  • Menzies Foundation Professor of Allied Health Research, Griffith University (2017 – present)
  • Professor / Discipline Lead in Physiotherapy, Griffith University (2017 – 2017)
  • Professor / Chair in Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy, VU Amsterdam (2014 – 2016)
  • Program Director of the MSc in Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Sciences, VU Amsterdam
  • A/Professor, School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland (2011 – 2013)
  • A/Professor, Kathmandu University, Nepal (2012 – 2012)
  • Senior Lecturer, School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland (2009 – 2011)
  • Senior Research Fellow, NHMRC CCRE in Spinal pain, Injury and Health, The University of Queensland (2006 – 2008)
  • Research officer, Human Neuroscience Unit, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sc., The University of Queensland (2002 – 2005)
  • Associate lecturer and PhD student -part time- (1995 – 2001). Faculty of Physical Education and Physiotherapy, KU Leuven
  • Physiotherapist and clinical educator, University Hospitals Leuven (1993 – 2001)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Biomedical Sciences (1995 – 2001). Faculty of Physical Education and Physiotherapy, KU Leuven
  • Bachelor in Physiotherapy -Maxima cum Laude- (1989 – 1991) Faculty of Physical Education and Physiotherapy, KU Leuven
  • Master (Licentiate) in Physiotherapy (Maxima cum Laude). Faculty of Physical Education and Physiotherapy, KU Leuven (1991 – 1993)
  • Michel has published 85 papers in Medline/PubMed-listed international peer-reviewed journals, 5 papers
    in national journals and 6 chapters in leading international textbooks. With respect to the international
    peer-reviewed papers, Michel is first author or senior/corresponding author on ~60% of these papers,
    indicating that Michel is an effective driver of research. Many of his papers are published in leading journals
    (Top 10%; Top 25%) across different disciplines, such as Br J Sports Med (IF 7.9); Anesthesiology (IF: 6.5);
    Pain: (IF 5.6); PLOS One (IF: 2.8); Cochrane Database Systematic Reviews: (IF: 6.7); JOSPT (IF: 3.1); J
    Physiother (IF: 4.5); J Orthop Res (IF: 3.4).

Michel Coppieters

  • Menzies Foundation Professor of Allied Health Research, Griffith University (2017 – present)
  • Professor / Discipline Lead in Physiotherapy, Griffith University (2017 – 2017)
  • Professor / Chair in Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy, VU Amsterdam (2014 – 2016)
  • Program Director of the MSc in Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Sciences, VU Amsterdam
  • A/Professor, School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland (2011 – 2013)
  • A/Professor, Kathmandu University, Nepal (2012 – 2012)
  • Senior Lecturer, School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland (2009 – 2011)
  • Senior Research Fellow, NHMRC CCRE in Spinal pain, Injury and Health, The University of Queensland (2006 – 2008)
  • Research officer, Human Neuroscience Unit, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sc., The University of Queensland (2002 – 2005)
  • Associate lecturer and PhD student -part time- (1995 – 2001). Faculty of Physical Education and Physiotherapy, KU Leuven
  • Physiotherapist and clinical educator, University Hospitals Leuven (1993 – 2001)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Biomedical Sciences (1995 – 2001). Faculty of Physical Education and Physiotherapy, KU Leuven
  • Bachelor in Physiotherapy -Maxima cum Laude- (1989 – 1991) Faculty of Physical Education and Physiotherapy, KU Leuven
  • Master (Licentiate) in Physiotherapy (Maxima cum Laude). Faculty of Physical Education and Physiotherapy, KU Leuven (1991 – 1993)
  • Michel has published 85 papers in Medline/PubMed-listed international peer-reviewed journals, 5 papers
    in national journals and 6 chapters in leading international textbooks. With respect to the international
    peer-reviewed papers, Michel is first author or senior/corresponding author on ~60% of these papers,
    indicating that Michel is an effective driver of research. Many of his papers are published in leading journals
    (Top 10%; Top 25%) across different disciplines, such as Br J Sports Med (IF 7.9); Anesthesiology (IF: 6.5);
    Pain: (IF 5.6); PLOS One (IF: 2.8); Cochrane Database Systematic Reviews: (IF: 6.7); JOSPT (IF: 3.1); J
    Physiother (IF: 4.5); J Orthop Res (IF: 3.4).

Reflections on Neuropathies and Neurodynamics

The effective management of neuropathies, such as radiculopathy and cubital tunnel syndrome, remains challenging. Recent discoveries revealed local and remote neuro-immune responses following nerve entrapment. These remote responses include the dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord and brain. Insight in these widespread changes has helped us understand the complex clinical presentation of patients with neuropathies, the suboptimal diagnostic accuracy of clinical tests and technical investigations, and often poor treatment outcomes. However, it also forms the foundation and justification for various exercise interventions, such as neurodynamic and aerobic exercises. In this presentation, we will reveal pathobiological mechanisms, how interventions can reverse these, and what he clinical evidence (efficacy) is for various types of intervention for various conditions, such as nerve-related neck and back pain.